Is greener better? Nine conclusions from LGIM's ESG report

Legal & General Investment Management has released new research about the public attitude's to the environment. Here are the key conclusions.

Background

Legal and General Investment Management (LGIM) has conducted research with polling company Opinium, focusing on consumer attitudes of 2,003 UK adults aged 18 to 55 to environmental issues and barriers to positive action.

Click On To Read The Key Conclusions

 

 

Background

Legal and General Investment Management (LGIM) has conducted research with polling company Opinium, focusing on consumer attitudes of 2,003 UK adults aged 18 to 55 to environmental issues and barriers to positive action.

Click On To Read The Key Conclusions

 

 

Conclusion:

The vast majority of the population believes environmental issues are important, with almost all all Brits doing something to minimise their environmental impact.

What the report said:

92% of surveyees say that minimising impact to the environment in important to them.

A quarter of people say they would be more likely to invest if they knew their investments were improving the environment.

11% of Brits rarely or never take action in their everyday lives to help minimise their impact on the environment.

Conclusion:

Many people lie about the extent of their environment-friendly actions, for social gain. There is a clear difference in numbers of those who care, and those who act. 

What the report said:

More than a quarter (26%) of Britons exaggerate environmental credentials to maintain social status.

A fifth say their friends will look down on them if they thought they weren’t behaving responsibly towards the environment, as the ‘Attenborough Effect’ takes hold.

18 to 24 year-olds are more than twice as likely to exaggerate environmental actions compared to those aged 45 to 55.

45% feel like they could be doing more.

Conclusion:

People are discouraged from being environmentally friendly due to both economic reasons, and a lack of awareness/education in how to help the environment.

What the report said:

28% of people tell us that if they saved money by being more environmentally friendly, they would be encouraged to do more.

32% say they simply can’t afford to minimise their impact on the environment.

17% feel they don’t know enough about how they can make a difference.

18% believe that more environmental education at school would be extremely beneficial.

Conclusion:

Whilst people are split as to whether it is the responsibility of the government or individuals to create a greener world, most do not think it is the businesses who should be trying to achieve this.

What the report said:

31% indicate it is the responsibility of government while the same percentage say it is individuals acting themselves.

Only 15% think it’s the role of business to create a greener world.

Conclusion:

Plastic pollution, animal welfare, food waste, and deforestation are the top concerns of the public.

What the report said:

46% Say tackling plastic pollution was significant to them, with helping animal welfare at 37%, tackling food waste at 35%, and stopping deforestation at 34%.

Conclusion:

18-24 Year olds focus more on reducing carbon footprint than those aged 45-55, however this is vice-versa for minimising water waste.

What the report said:

Those aged 18 to 24 cared more about reducing their carbon footprint than those aged 45 to 55.

Minimising water waste ranked higher for those aged 45 to 55, with 95% stating this was a concern for them compared to only 88% of 18 to 24 year-olds.

Conclusion:

Looking at the most common ways inwhich people reduce their impact, we can conclude most take positive action when the action has minimal cost.

What the report said:

65% Use reusable plastic bags at the supermarket.

59% Recycle plastics.

55% Take showers instead of baths.

51% Use paperless bills.

 

Conclusion:

Brititsh people do feel a morale duty to take positive action on the environment.  

What the report said:

23% Feel upset if they don’t act responsibly towards the environment.

34% Say they feel guilty if they don’t act responsibly towards the environment.

Conclusion:

The media can have some influence over the extent to which they act towards the environment.

What the report said:

Just 17% of respondents say information from the media influences their attitude to the environment. 

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